References

Boland M, O'Riordan M. Preparedness and management of global public health threats at points of entry in Ireland and the EU in the context of a potential Brexit. Global Health. 2019; 15 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12992-019-0496-4

Chan JFW, Yuan S, Kok KH A familial cluster of pneumonia associated with the 2019 novel coronavirus indicating person-to-person transmission: a study of a family cluster. Lancet. 2020; https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30154-9

Department of Health and Social Care, Public Health England. Coronavirus: latest information and advice. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/syds3y4 (accessed 4 January 2020)

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Pneumonia cases possibly associated with a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China. Risk assessment. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/t23899z (accessed 4 February 2020)

Fitfortravel (Travel and International Health Team of Health Protection Scotland). Novel coronavirus (Wuhan, China) infection. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/s9qs6ol (accessed 4 February 2020)

Huang CL, Wang YM, Li XW Clinical features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China. Lancet. 2020; https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30183-5

Lu H, Stratton CW, Tang YW. Outbreak of pneumonia of unknown etiology in Wuhan China: the mystery and the miracle. J Med Virol.. 2020; https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25678

Mahase E. China coronavirus: WHO declares international emergency as death toll exceeds 200. BMJ.. 2020; 368 https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m408

Wilson ME. The traveler and emerging infections: sentinel, courier, transmitter. J Appl Microbiol.. 2003; 94:1S-11S

World Health Organization. World Health Organization best practices for the naming of new human infectious diseases. 2015. https://tinyurl.com/sgqzt5k (accessed 4 February 2020)

World Health Organization. International Health Regulations (2005). 2016. https://www.who.int/ihr/publications/9789241580496/en/ (accessed 4 February 2020)

World Health Organization. Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV): situation report 10. 2020a. https://tinyurl.com/rhryhe7 (accessed 4 February 2020)

World Health Organization. Statement on the meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). 2020b. https://tinyurl.com/v8ulkhf (accessed 4 February 2020)

World Health Organization. Statement on the second meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). 2020c. https://tinyurl.com/rjdtx2k (accessed 4 February 2020)

Infections without borders: a new coronavirus in Wuhan, China

13 February 2020
3 min read
Volume 29 · Issue 3

Due to increases in international travel and commerce, global infectious disease epidemiology is rapidly evolving. For example, travel between most places in the world takes less time than the incubation period for many infectious diseases (Wilson, 2003). From an infectious disease perspective, globalisation has resulted in a world without borders where control of infections necessitates international cooperation and coordination. Currently we are experiencing this first-hand with the outbreak of a new coronavirus in the city of Wuhan in China, resulting in immense concern regarding a severe global public health threat.

The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates the international response to major outbreaks of infectious disease based on its International Health Regulations (2005) (WHO, 2016). From a European perspective the overarching body responsible for communicable disease control and response to health threats is the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) (https://www.ecdc.europa.eu). With the UK departing the European Union it is essential to agree a future joint coordination mechanism for a robust, coordinated approach to global public health threats at points of entry (Boland and O'Riordan, 2019). Infectious diseases do not respect borders and, to control them, neither should we.

Register now to continue reading

Thank you for visiting British Journal of Nursing and reading some of our peer-reviewed resources for nurses. To read more, please register today. You’ll enjoy the following great benefits:

What's included

  • Limited access to clinical or professional articles

  • Unlimited access to the latest news, blogs and video content