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Hwang SW, Wilkins R, Tiepkema M, O'Campo PJ, Dunn JR. Mortality among residents of shelters, rooming houses and hotels in Canada: 11 year followup study. BMJ. 2009; 339 https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b4036

Luchenski S, Maguire N, Aldridge RW What works in inclusion health: overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations. Lancet. 2018; (10117)266-280 https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31959-1

Office for National Statistics. Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2019 registrations. 2020. http://tinyurl.com/fpun45dv (accessed 13 July 2021)

Public Health England. All our health. 2019. http://tinyurl.com/cbrrm2f2 (accessed 13 July 2021)

Public Health England. Inclusion health: applying All Our Health. 2021. http://tinyurl.com/32uth93h (accessed 13 July 2021)

What is inclusion health and why is it important for all nurses and midwives?

22 July 2021
6 min read
Volume 30 · Issue 14

Inclusion health is a catch-all term used to describe people who are socially excluded and those who typically experience multiple overlapping risk factors for poor health, including poverty, violence and complex trauma. Examples are people who experience homelessness, drug and alcohol dependence, vulnerable migrants, Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities, sex workers, people in contact with the justice system and victims of modern slavery (Public Health England (PHE), 2021).

People in these population groups are also more likely to experience poor health because health care is not made as easily accessible to them, despite the fact that they are more likely to have several concurrent health conditions that put them at greater risk of dying young (Hwang et al, 2009).

Nurses and midwives should be familiar with and understand the concept of inclusion health for people in their care because of the enormous implications this has on the way they deliver care. For example, if individuals from inclusion health populations are to improve their health outcomes and live longer and healthier lives, they must be able to receive timely, easily accessible and available health and care services.

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