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Addressing a real concern

14 November 2019
2 min read
Volume 28 · Issue 20

As I walked across the concourse of Waterloo station my eye was caught by a display promoting the launch of UNICEF's campaign declaring ‘war on disease’ (https://www.unicef.org.uk/), not to mention the bright blue eye-catching bags being handed out emblazoned with the message ‘vaccinate, vaccinate, vaccinate!’ Given the recent loss of the UK'S measles-free status, achieved in 2016, this promotion at one of the busiest rail stations in the UK seemed appropriate, yet at the same time the need for the message is thought provoking. Why has the huge effort made, not least by nurses, to achieve the 95% vaccination rate necessary to achieve herd immunity against one of the most contagious diseases known to man (World Health Organization (WHO), 2019a), once again fallen short? Have the knock-on effects of Wakefield still not been ‘put to bed’, or is something else going on?

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