References

NMC community nursing plans put child patients at risk. 2021. https://tinyurl.com/yujwycfb (accessed 3 August 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Evaluation of post-registration standards of proficiency for specialist community public health nurses and the standards for specialist education and practice standards. 2019. https://tinyurl.com/58z6fknn (accessed 3 August 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Standards of proficiency for community nursing SPQs. 2021. https://tinyurl.com/2jf7vjmt (accessed 3 August 2021)

Pye Tait Consulting. Themes from pre-consultation stakeholder engagement for the post registration standards review. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/5b4np6b9 (accessed 3 August 2021)

Queen's Nursing Institute, Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland. The QNI/QNIS voluntary standards for community children's nurse education and practice. 2018. https://tinyurl.com/hftcmzvw (accessed 3 August 2021)

Royal College of Nursing. Futureproofing community children's nursing. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/axr9n4mw (accessed 3 August 2021)

Community nursing: will new standards be a panacea?

12 August 2021
2 min read
Volume 30 · Issue 15

After more than 15 years the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is reviewing standards for specialist practice (NMC, 2021). There has been extensive work undertaken to explore what practitioners, educators and employers think about the outdated standards (NMC, 2019; Pye Tait Consulting, 2020). This work shows how, in the past, the NMC, through the standards for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) and the Specialist Practitioner Qualifications (SPQs), attempted to create an economy of scale by conflating community nursing with public health work. That this did not meet the needs of nurses is evident in the pre-consultation evaluation (NMC, 2019). There is concern from children's community nurses (CCNs) that the NMC is repeating its error of attempting to construct ‘generic’ standards (Launder, 2021), which allow education providers to deliver potentially more commercially profitable programmes, but which do not meet the needs of nurses or their patients.

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