References

All Party Parliamentary Group for UN Women. Prevalence and reporting of sexual harassment in UK public spaces. https://tinyurl.com/2dvvxw98 (accessed 30 March 2021)

‘Signal for Help’ is a new tool for abuse victims during the coronavirus lockdown and beyond. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/2utncf67 (accessed 30 March 2021)

BBC News. Sarah Everard: how a woman's death sparked a nation's soul-searching. 2021. https://tinyurl.com/y6473496 (accessed 30 March 2021)

McGill University. Signal for Help campaign launches to help people experiencing gender based violence during home isolation. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/wu8hd8nm (accessed 30 March 2021)

Spector PE, Zhou ZE, Che XX. Nurse exposure to physical and nonphysical violence, bullying, and sexual harassment: a quantitative review. Int J Nurs Stud.. 2014; 51:(1)72-84 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2013.01.010

Women's Funding Network. #SignalForHelp If you see the signal: reach out. 2021. https://tinyurl.com/bc946ewm (accessed 30 March 2021)

World Health Organization. Devastatingly pervasive: 1 in 3 women globally experience violence. 2021. https://tinyurl.com/v3uec85a (accessed 30 March 2021)

Share the ‘Signal for Help’

08 April 2021
2 min read
Volume 30 · Issue 7

In the wake of Sarah Everard's tragic murder in March 2021 (BBC News, 2021), a heightened movement is surging, recognising vulnerability around safety on our streets alongside private thoughts of ‘that could have been me’ as we reflect on and relive our own unpleasant experiences or near misses. Sarah's is now a familiar face for all the wrong reasons. In a YouGov survey for the All Party Parliamentary Group for UN Women (2021), 1000 women highlighted the prevalence of street harassment. Sarah's case exemplifies an extreme example of this statistic. The survey reports that 97* of women aged 18 to 24 had experienced sexual harassment, with 80* saying that this took place in a public space. Sarah's life, so wrongly and prematurely taken when walking home after having dinner with a friend in Clapham, London, illustrates this and also a larger all-pervading picture of violence in the workplace and at home, not only by a ‘stranger’, but commonly by people we know.

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