References

British Medical Association. Health and manufacturing unions joint letter to Rt Hon Alok Sharma, secretary of state for business, energy and industrial strategy. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/y954hdyf (accessed 2 June 2020)

RCN ‘disappointed’ over lack of nurse voice in PPE debate’ Nursing Times. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/ycnzuaq9 (accessed 2 June 2020)

Open letter to Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP. 2020a. https://tinyurl.com/y7y2jpaw (accessed 2 June 2020)

Letter to Sarah Albion, chief executive, Health and Safety Executive. 2020b. https://tinyurl.com/ybrc7n6a (accessed 2 June 2020)

GP and support worker are latest NHS staff to die from coronavirus. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/ycps63uo (accessed 2 June 2020)

Royal College of Nursing. Personal protective equipment: use and availability during the COVID-19 pandemic. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/y8otko3k (accessed 2 June 2020)

Coronavirus: doctors call for inquiry into PPE shortages for NHS staff. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/yb4f74tq (accessed 2 June 2020)

Supply and demand of PPE

11 June 2020
2 min read
Volume 29 · Issue 11

With the increasing number of tragic deaths of frontline staff in the UK, the adequate provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) in the NHS has been called into question by professional bodies, industry and the public at large. Perraudin (2020) links the shortages of PPE in healthcare settings with an increasing death toll among frontline workers.

Although attempting to place pressure on the Government, key nursing leaders were excluded from critical parliamentary discussions regarding the provision of PPE for frontline staff, following widespread criticism of the Government (Ford, 2020). The Chief Executive and General Secretary of the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), Dame Donna Kinnair was compelled to write directly to both the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, and then to the Chief Executive of the Health and Safety Executive, Sarah Albon, to express serious concerns for members regarding lack of PPE and the associated risks this poses in the transmission of COVID-19, as concerns appeared to be ignored (Kinnair, 2020a; 2020b). The British Medical Association (BMA) has indicated that, despite Government assurances of adequate stockpiles, due to the prolonged nature of the COVID-19 crisis, this supply will not be adequate, posing a huge risk to frontline staff (BMA, 2020).

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