References

Abrams P, Cardozo L, Fall M The standardisation of terminology in lower urinary tract function: report from the standardisation sub-committee of the International Continence Society. Urology. 2003; 61:(1)37-49 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0090-4295(02)02243-4

Blaivas JG, Panagopoulos G, Weiss JP, Somaroo C. Two types of urgency. Neurourol Urodyn. 2009; 28:(3)188-90 https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.20525

British Association of Urological Surgeons. Patients: I think I might have… incontinence of urine. https://tinyurl.com/y4jod6qs (accessed 1 December 2020)

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Urinary tract infection (recurrent): antimicrobial prescribing. NICE guideline NG112. 2018a. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng112 (accessed 1 December 2020)

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing. NICE guideline NG109. 2018b. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng109/chapter/Summary-of-the-evidence#antibiotic-course-length (accessed 1 December 2020)

Perrotta C, Aznar M, Mejia R, Albert X, Ng CW. Oestrogens for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008; (2) https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD005131.pub2

Weber MA, Lim V, Oryszczyn J The effect of vaginal oestriol cream on subjective and objective symptoms of stress urinary incontinence and vaginal atrophy: an international multi-centre pilot study. Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2017; 82:(1)15-21 https://doi.org/10.1159/000445074

Taking care of continence patients during the COVID-19 pandemic

10 December 2020
9 min read
Volume 29 · Issue 22

Quite clearly, and for good reason, 2020 has been the year that the full focus of the world's attention and resources has been on the global coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19).

Initial public health advice from the UK Government in March of this year was to ‘stay home, protect the NHS’. This advice, aiming to reduce avoidable transmission of the virus, also had an unfortunate unintended consequence. Anecdotal evidence from patients suggests the message was interpreted to mean they should try not to ‘trouble their GP’ for any reason, and certainly not for something as ‘trivial’ as their continence problems.

As the year has progressed, the Government's message has changed to assert that, indeed, UK citizens should report red flag symptoms such as blood in the urine, weight loss, altered bowel habit etc. But as far as specialist secondary care referrals are concerned, older people in particular are still largely reluctant to seek help for problems such as urinary frequency, urgency, bothersome nocturia, urine leakage, voiding difficulties and symptoms of urinary discomfort or infection.

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