References

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Urinary incontinence in women: management. Clinical guideline 171. 2013. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg171 (accessed 4 December 2019)

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Urinary incontinence in women. Quality standard QS77. 2015. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qs77/resources/urinary-incontinence-in-women-pdf-2098853147077 (accessed 4 December 2019)

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Single-incision short sling mesh insertion for stress urinary incontinence in women. Interventional procedures guidance IPG566. 2016. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ipg566 (accessed 4 December 2019)

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management. NICE guideline NG123. 2019. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng123 (accessed 4 December 2019)

NHS website. What are pelvic floor exercises?. 2019. https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/womens-health/what-are-pelvic-floor-exercises/ (accessed 4 December 2019)

Urinary incontinence in women: treatment recommendations

12 December 2019
4 min read
Volume 28 · Issue 22

Abstract

Ian Peate, Editor in Chief, British Journal of Nursing, discusses treatment options for women experiencing urge, stress or mixed urinary incontinence and why a pelvic health pathway is needed

The use of mesh in treating urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse—conditions that are common after childbirth—has come under intense scrutiny with much public concern. Many women may have the mesh implanted without a problem; however, for others, it can lead to unacceptable complications that include the mesh cutting into organs or through tissues, intense pain and recurring infection.

Recommendations produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) (2019) suggest that the full range of non-surgical options should be offered to those women with urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse prior to any surgical procedures being undertaken. The non-surgical options include lifestyle interventions, physical therapies, behavioural therapies and medications that are used for urinary incontinence. Non-surgical options for pelvic organ prolapse include lifestyle modification, the use of topical oestrogen, pelvic floor muscle training and pessary management.

The 2019 NICE recommendation take into account the previous 2016 and 2013 recommendations and guidance. These 2019 recommendations replace the 2013 clinical guideline (NICE, 2013) and the 2016 interventional procedures guidance (NICE 2016). They are based on the NICE (2015) Quality Standard, Urinary Incontinence in Women.

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