References

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Standards for specialist education and practice. 2001. https://tinyurl.com/wzrerwn4 (accessed 1 June 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Specialist community and public health nursing. 2004. https://tinyurl.com/v488wjp7 (accessed 1 June 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Strategy 2020-2025. 2020. https://tinyurl.com/bnbyu7eh (accessed 1 June 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Standards of proficiency for specialist community public health nursing. 2021a. https://tinyurl.com/5xv4xk93 (accessed 1 June 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Standards of proficiency for community nursing specialist practice qualifications. 2021b. https://tinyurl.com/2jf7vjmt (accessed 1 June 2021)

Nursing and Midwifery Council. Part 3: standards for post-registration education programmes. 2021c. https://tinyurl.com/mntypa4m (accessed 1 June 2021)

Postregistration standards

10 June 2021
2 min read
Volume 30 · Issue 11

Towards the end of 2019, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) established an expert steering group to review how postregistration education and development has evolved and make recommendations. The NMC is exploring its current postregistration standards for specialist community and public health nursing (SCPHN) (NMC, 2001; 2004) and specialist practice qualifications (SPQs).

There is an absolute need to update these standards, they are dated, do not reflect contemporary practice and are no longer fit for purpose.

A transformation of all of the NMC education standards (pre-registration standards, prescribing standards, the NMC education framework and standards for student supervision and assessment) has been happening since 2016. The aim is to ensure that they are fit for purpose and that all registrants are prepared for and equipped with the skills and knowledge that are required to deliver high quality and safe care in a future-proofed way. COVID-19 has accelerated changes in practice and specialist community nurses have had to adapt to new challenges, new technologies and new ways of working. They prioritise the needs and care requirements of their patients, and keep people out of hospital.

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