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Effect of music intervention in colonoscopy-naïve adults: a randomised controlled trial

26 May 2022
13 min read
Volume 31 · Issue 10

Abstract

Background:

Previous studies have evaluated music interventions before and during a colonoscopy, but the results are contradictory and inconclusive.

Aims:

The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of a music intervention with MusiCure music, both before and during colonoscopy.

Methods:

The study was a two-armed, prospective, randomised, controlled trial and 337 patients undergoing colonoscopy were included. Patients were allocated to receive relaxing music (MusiCure) before and during the colonoscopy or standard care (no music). Outcome measures included pain intensity, duration of the colonoscopy, consumption of alfentanil and midazolam, vital signs, patient satisfaction and caecal intubation rates (CIR).

Findings:

Men in the music group had a lower middle arterial blood pressure compared with men in the no music group. The majority of patients in the music group would prefer to listen to music if they need a colonoscopy in the future. No differences were found between groups regarding pain intensity, duration of the colonoscopy, consumption of alfentanil and midazolam, vital signs, patient satisfaction and CIR.

Conclusion:

The researchers were unable to show an effect on the primary endpoints. However, a high patient satisfaction was found in the music group and a decrease in the blood pressure during the colonoscopy, indicating a reduced stress level. Music before and during a colonoscopy may improve the patient experience.

Colonoscopy is the gold standard for visualisation and diagnosis of conditions involving the colon and terminal ileum. However, colonoscopy is often associated with high levels of anxiety due to the anticipation of pain and possible outcome (Martindale et al, 2014). This can lead to an increased use of sedative and analgesic drugs during the colonoscopy and thus the potential for patients to be less willing to repeat the procedure (Hayes et al, 2003) with associated negative medical implications (Hayes et al, 2003; Martindale et al, 2014).

Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of interventions such as music before and during colonoscopy including on the anxiety level, stress level, vital signs, consumption of sedative and analgesic drugs, the duration of the colonoscopy and caecal intubation rates (Schiemann et al, 2002; Hayes et al, 2003; López-Cepero Andrada et al, 2004; Bechtold et al, 2009). However, results so far are contradictory and inconclusive due to factors including varying types of music, timing and type of music delivery and small sample sizes.

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