Effective decision-making: applying the theories to nursing practice

23 January 2020
10 min read
Volume 29 · Issue 2

Abstract

Many theories have been proposed for the decision-making conducted by nurses across all practices and disciplines. These theories are fundamental to consider when reflecting on our decision-making processes to inform future practice. In this article three of these theories are juxtaposed with a case study of a patient presenting with an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). These theories are descriptive, normative and prescriptive, and will be used to analyse and interpret the process of decision-making within the context of patient assessment.

Decision-making is a fundamental concept of nursing practice that conforms to a systematic trajectory involving the assessment, interpretation, evaluation and management of patient-specific situations (Dougherty et al, 2015). Shared decision-making is vital to consider in terms of patient autonomy and professional duty of care as set out in the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) (2018)Code, which underpins nursing practice. Consequently, the following assessment and decision-making processes were conducted within the remits of practice as a student nurse. Decision-making is a dynamic process in nursing practice, and the theories emphasise the importance of adaptability and reflective practice to identify factors that impact on patient care (Pearson, 2013). Three decision-making theories will be explored within the context of a decision made in practice. To abide by confidentiality requirements, the pseudonym ‘Linda’ will be used throughout. Patient consent was obtained prior to writing.

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